US President, Andrew Johnson’s Veto Statement Against Official, Constitution “Black” Power Laws

(vot-dir)

As there were “Black Code-Jim Crow” laws to disenfranchise the power of the militarily, American African, liberated chattel slaves, federalized black citizens, of the only and exclusive, federal, super citizenship status, instead, since 1966 to present (157 years), there is an element of such tremendous, unprecedented authority-power granted to the body politic of We the People, which is CONSTITUTIONAL BLACK POWER (CBP) that upon studying this transforming Law, this 17th President of the United States (POTUS), a Democrat of the Democratic Party, VETOED it.

Nonetheless the Republican Party-led Congress over,rode it, thereby, codifying black, super citizenship status into the US Constitution via the enactment of the 14th Amendment.

Below, Mr. Johnson clearly, articulately and passionately expressed his understandable, but wrong causes for for his now, legendary VETO.

And for this mindset of the Mr. Johnson, he eventually fell into the first POTUS in US history to be impeached by the House on March 2 and 3, 1868, but acquitted by the Senate on May 26,1868.

I regret that the bill, which has passed both Houses of Congress, entitled “An act to protect all persons in the United States in their civil rights and furnish the means of their vindication,” contains provisions which I can not approve consistently with my sense of duty to the whole people and my obligations to the Constitution of the United States.

I am therefore constrained to return it to the Senate, the House in which it originated, with my objections to its’ becoming a law.

In all our history, in all our experience as a people living under Federal and State law, no such system as that contemplated by the details of this bill has ever before been proposed or adopted.

They establish for the security of the colored race safeguards which go infinitely beyond any that the General Government has ever provided for the white race.

In fact, the distinction of race and color is by the bill made to operate in favor of the colored and against the white race.

They interfere with the municipal legislation of the States, with the relations existing exclusively between a State and its citizens, or between inhabitants of the same State-an absorption and assumption of power by the General Government which, if acquiesced in, must sap and destroy our federative system of limited powers and break down the barriers which preserve the rights of the States.

It is another step, or rather stride, toward centralization and the concentration of all legislative powers in the National Government.

I now return the bill to the Senate, and regret that in considering the bills and joint resolutions—forty-two in number—which have been thus far submitted for my approval I am compelled to withhold my assent from a second measure that has received the sanction of both Houses of Congress.

(vot-dir)

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